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Weekly Wisdoms for the week of August 18, 2014

Be willing to let your schedule be altered if knowing God better requires it.

How can you know God better? Read his word, pray, listen for his voice, worship him. Notice that all of these things require time. In fact, improving any relationship with other people or with God requires time.

However, far too many people find themselves too busy to spend any time getting to know God better. They've filled their calendar with pursuits of money, wealth, success, and status. However, as Solomon discovers in Ecclesiastes 2:1-11, all of these pursuits are meaningless. Solomon built many houses, vineyards, gardens, and parks; he had many, many slaves and countless pieces of gold and silver, and he was the most prestigious man ever to live in Jerusalem. Indeed, he could buy anything his heart desired. However, Solomon comes to the realization that all of these things are worth nothing in the perspective of eternity: Yet when I surveyed all that my hands had done and what I had toiled to achieve, everything was meaningless, a chasing after the wind; nothing was gained under the sun (Ecclesiastes 2:11).

Therefore, don't worry about any of these earthly things; instead, seek to know God better (see Matthew 6:25-34).

This poem is a good reminder of what's really important in life.

I had always been taught
to ask God for what I needed
and that he would give me
whatever I ask for in his name.

So, I asked God for
prosperity, power, popularity,
good grades, safety, success,
good friends, health, and wealth.

In all these things,
I asked God for more of what I wanted,
but he gave me more of what I needed:
Himself.

If all these earthly things are hindering your relationship with God, alter your schedule: get rid of some things so that you can spend time knowing God better.

The first Adam was a man who tried to play God; the second Adam was God who became man.

Genesis 3 records the story of Adam, the first human being created by God, who tried to "be like God" (verse 5). By attempting to become God, Adam sinned, and as a result every single one of us became condemned by God as a sinner: "one trespass [the sin committed by Adam] resulted in condemnation for all people" (Romans 5:18).

In essence, Adam was our representative before God. He sinned, and his sin was imputed (i.e., attributed, given) to us. Adam's sin was counted against us such that we became an enemy of God.

Fortunately for us, God did not leave us hopelessly in our sin condemned justly by his wrath; instead, he demonstrated his unfailing love for us by sending his son, the second person of the Trinity, to die for our sins offering a way for us to escape his wrath (Romans 5:8).

God, himself, became man (Philippians 2:6-8), and bore all our sins. Paul puts it like this: "For as in Adam all die, so in Christ all will be made alive" (1 Corinthians 15:22).

Just as through Adam's disobedience his sin is imputed to us, so also through Christ's obedience his righteousness is imputed to us. The first Adam tried to become like God, and, in so doing, every human being became an enemy of God. The second Adam, Jesus Christ, is God who became man, and, in so doing, he opened the door for every other human being to be reborn as a friend of God.

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